INDUSTRY ANALYSIS

The Healthcare Accreditation Industry

The healthcare accreditation industry consists of a small array of organizations that offer verification services to healthcare organizations across the U.S., and some internationally. These accreditation companies essentially ensure that healthcare professionals and their facilities are continuously providing the highest possible level of care to their patients, even as standards evolve. Within this market, there are six notable companies that provide accreditation services — 1) The Joint Commission, 2) The National Committee for Quality Assurance, 3) The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities, 4) The Utilization Review Accreditation Commission, 5) The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, and 6) The Council on Accreditation. For each of these organizations, an in-depth analysis of how they differentiate themselves from one another, their pricing models and revenue streams, links to available financial documents, and an analysis of the effects of accreditation by each organization on patient care/consumer behavior has been detailed below. The majority of the information regarding each accreditation organization discussed was pulled from various pages across each organization’s website, aside from a few instances in which outside sources were used to gauge consumer perspectives and impacts.
For the most part, pricing data for these accreditation firms was not publicly listed, as the total cost is variable and based on multiple factors including the number of physicians, locations, and more. In these instances, any data on pricing that was publicly accessible has been clearly stated, followed by a link to the contact page to request a quote. In other cases, pricing data was publicly available but was rather complex. In these moments, either a screenshot of the model or a link to the direct page where the entire pricing model is described by the accreditation firm was provided in lieu of copying the data down.
With respect to the financial statements, these accreditation firms are all tax-exempt non-profits, meaning that they are not required by law to publicly disclose any financial data aside from their IRS Form 990 and proof of tax exemption applicability. Because of this, only some of the accreditation firms depicted here chose to publish annual reports and financial statements. In situations where these documents were not publicly available, tax audits were used as an alternative, as these files contain copies of the annual financial statements from the accreditation organizations. The respective pages within the tax audit PDF file in which the financial statements can be viewed is also stated below for easier viewing. When tax audits were also unavailable, the IRS Form 990s were linked to because despite them being tax forms, they contained the total revenue earned by the company each year, as well as a very scrutinous breakdown of expenses.
In addition to this, information has been provided regarding how these organizations and others view, think about, and attempt to limit their liability with respect to the healthcare professionals and locations they have certified. This data is of particular interest because accreditation is not necessarily a requirement of any healthcare organization — unless they are looking to obtain certain federal benefits — leaving room for them to potentially attack accreditation companies in the case of a lawsuit or shortcoming. Accreditation companies such as the ones detailed here have gone to careful lengths to protect themselves from such liabilities, and this information is depicted below.
As a final component to this research, barriers that hinder healthcare organizations from obtaining accreditation from these types of companies have been identified and expressed below. This data was sourced primarily from research studies, expert news articles, and other reputable sources. These barriers are most commonly associated with financial struggles, particularly because accreditation requires annual fees, and depending on the size of the company, large sums of money upfront for on-site surveys. Barriers that are specific to the accreditation firms already discussed are depicted within their respective sections of this research report. More general hindrances are depicted in a separate section, as they can and do apply broadly to all accreditation firms and processes.

The Joint Commission (TJC)

Differentiation

  • The Joint Commission is the nation’s oldest and largest healthcare accreditation organization, making it a strong leader for setting standards of care for public health nationwide.
  • TJC collaborates with numerous healthcare associations, including but not limited to the American Heart Association, American Medical Association, and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons to consistently update safety policies and standards through all of their accreditation programs.
  • To every healthcare organization that obtains accreditation from TJC, additional resources are provided to ensure standards of care are constantly met. This includes virtual services, complimentary advisory services, healthcare software, educational material, and access to exclusive publications. This program, called the Joint Commission Resources (JCR), also offers international healthcare organizations accreditation through a subdivision called the Joint Commission International.
  • The Joint Commission offers seven accreditation programs that are defined based on the services being offered by a healthcare organization. These accreditation programs are as follows:
  • By early 2021, TJC is also planning to offer an Assisted Living Community Accreditation Program. As this program is still in the works, TJC is offering interested assisted living facilities the chance to participate in a two-day, on-site pilot program to test out the process and receive accreditation at no cost.
  • On average, TJC accreditations take between two weeks to two months to obtain after the initial on-site survey. Accreditations earned via TJC are valid for three years, except for laboratory, disease-specific care, and health care staffing services accreditations, which are valid for two years.

Pricing

  • There are three fees associated with obtaining accreditation from TJC. The first is a one-time, non-transferable, non-refundable application deposit of $1,700. This amount is credited towards the future accreditation fees until depleted, after which fees related to the on-site survey and annual renewal are required.
  • Although definitive pricing data is not directly listed on the website for TJC — as interested parties are required to contact TJC for a quote — this pricing model worksheet depicts how a healthcare organization can estimate their total costs (on-site survey fee and annual fee) based on the types of services offered, the number of locations, and volume of patients/appointments/cases.
  • Annual fees for TJC accreditations range anywhere from $1,820 for facilities with less than 5,000 in weight volume of patients/appointments/cases, up to $25,215 for facilities that manage more than 1,600,000 patients/appointment/cases.
  • On-site survey fees for TJC accreditation range anywhere from $3,020 for facilities with less than 30,000 weighted volume cases, up to $27,850 for those handling more than 1,600,000 cases.
  • The Joint Commission does publicize that approximately 60% of an organization’s total accreditation fees are due within the first year of the on-site survey taking place.

Revenue Streams

  • As per their Consolidated Financial Statements (attached below), The Joint Commission brings in revenue from the following primary sources, listed in order of revenue earned in 2019:
    • On-site survey fees
    • Annual accreditation subscription fees
  • Secondary sources of revenue for TJC, in order of revenue earned in 2019, are as follows:
    • Publications and multimedia
    • Consultative technical assistance
    • Educational programs
    • Performance measurement activities
    • Continuous service readiness

Financial Statements

Effects of Receiving Accreditation on Consumer Behavior & Experience

  • Consumers tend to feel more confident in the care they are receiving at TJC-accredited healthcare organizations, as the accreditation shows that the facility proves that they are consistently proving to provide the very highest quality of care.
  • Healthcare professionals are also attracted to work at TCJ-accredited organizations, as these facilities more often provide staff with the opportunity to progress in their professional careers.

Barriers to Achieving Accreditation

  • Some healthcare organizations opt to not renew their accreditation with TJC primarily due to the high costs and administrative difficulties associated with obtaining and maintaining the accreditation. While facilities are overall pleased with the results of the accreditation, it is pricey compared to competitor programs that can offer similar outcomes.
  • Other healthcare facilities have noted that the benchmarks of The Joint Commission accreditation programs, while great in standard and value for patient health, can inadvertently detract from patient care by putting too much pressure to achieve those goals.

National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA)

Differentiation

  • The National Committee for Quality Assurance offers programs for three types of healthcare systems, each of which contains more specific programs in which accreditations, certifications, recognitions can be obtained:
  • The NCQA places heavy emphasis on their use of the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) to measure the performance of the organizations they accredit/recognize.
  • A major focus of advertising by the NCQA is the number of patients that are impacted by organizations they have accredited or certified. For example, 191 million patients can use the HEDIS system to track the care they are receiving, and 173 million are enrolled in health plans that are accredited by the NCQA.
  • The NCQA also advertises that they work with nearly 50 consulting organizations to help keep up with the measurements and improvement surveying of their accredited organizations.
  • Available upon request, the NCQA offers healthcare organizations access to their Quality Solutions Group (QSG), which creates tailor-made goals, benchmarks, and best practices for businesses looking to achieve specific goals.

Pricing

  • Pricing for PCMH organizations depends on the number of locations included in the program, as well as the number of clinicians employed. The full pricing model for both single- and multi-site organizations can be viewed here due to its complexity.
  • Pricing for PCSP organizations is dependent upon the number of locations and number of clinicians employed. The full pricing model for both single- and multi-site organizations can be viewed here.
  • Pricing for Patient-Centered Connected Care facilities is based purely based on the number of locations an organization has. The standard survey cost for this recognition is $1,550/site for the first 50 sites, then $770/site for sites 51-100, and $250/site for 501+ sites.
  • Heart/stroke organizations can obtain their DCT license for $80, and then obtain recognition from the NCQA according to this pricing model.
  • The Diabetes Recognition Program (DRP) follows this pricing model after an organization pays $80 for their DCT license.
  • Pricing for all health plan accreditations and certifications through the NCQA are available by request only.
  • In the case that a healthcare organization decides to cancel their application within 45 calendar days of payment, the NCQA will refund 80% of the Initial Recognition Fee.
  • Refund requests made within 5 calendar days of payment are eligible to receive 100% of their Initial Recognition Fee back.
  • Any healthcare organization, whether single- or multi-site, that is applying for accreditation through the NCQA for the very first time can receive 20% of their Initial Recognition Fee through the company’s “Partners in Quality” discount.
  • Organizations looking to renew their NCQA accreditation must pay a $1,500 Reconsideration of a Recognition fee.
  • MAC reviews are charged as 50% of their current Recognition Fee for the healthcare organization applying for the review.

Revenue Streams

  • No financial documents were located directly from the NCQAs website. However, audits of tax documents that contained financial filings from the NCQA were located and used to identify the following primary sources of revenue, listed in order of revenue earned in 2017:
    • Accreditation and certification services
    • Federal, state, and other contracts and grants
  • Secondary sources of revenue for the NCQA, in order of revenue earned in 2017, are as follows:
    • Recognition programs
    • Information products
    • Publications
    • Education conferences

Financial Statements

Effects of Receiving Accreditation on Consumer Behavior & Experience

  • Consumers that are enrolled in an NCQA-accredited health plan can access the HEDIS benchmarking system free-of-charge to track their care and progress over time, which motivates them to live healthier lives.
  • Patients that are enrolled in NCQA-accredited health plans have reported that communicating with their physicians and obtaining medical advice and records has become significantly easier.
  • In a study analyzing data from the 2015 NCQA Quality Compass of 351 health plans, it was determined that higher patient satisfaction with condition monitoring and prevention were positively correlated with higher levels of NCQA accreditation.

Barriers to Achieving Accreditation

  • Some healthcare organizations misunderstand what obtaining accreditation from the NCQA will mean for their work. PCMHs, for example, have been found to think that upon receiving accreditation, they can just “go back” to running their practice as they were before. However, receiving accreditation from the NCQA also requires maintenance and growth of a very high standard of care, which for some physicians, is off-putting.

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF)

Differentiation

Pricing

  • Pricing info for accreditation via the CARF is variable depending on a variety of factors, including competitor pricing and the number of surveyors and days needed to analyze a location. Healthcare organizations must request a quote to know their prices.
  • Outside sources indicate that the initial, fixed fee for healthcare companies applying for accreditation through the CARF is $995 regardless of organization size, and then an additional $1,525 per surveyor, per day.
  • For substance abuse programs, the pricing model is as follows:
LOC Certification Fees

Revenue Streams

  • Based on IRS Form 990s, the primary source of revenue from the CARF each year is program services, such as accreditations.
  • Secondary sources of revenue earned by the CARF according to their IRS Form 990s include donor contributions, investment income, rental property income, and sales of assets.

Financial Statements

  • As the CARF is a tax-exempt non-profit organization, the business is not required to publicly disclose any financial information aside from their IRS Form 990 and proof of exemption. As a result, no financial statement documents were located for the CARF.
  • Despite the lack of publicly disclosed financial information by the CARF, the IRS Form 990s filed between 2011 and 2017 were located. These documents do contain the total revenue earned by the CARF each year, as well as a complete documentation of expenses. These documents are linked to below for the three most-recently published years:

Effects of Receiving Accreditation on Consumer Behavior & Experience

  • Elderly that are interested in senior care options often opt for an organization that is CARF-accredited because they trust the standards of cleanliness and comfort, as well as the quality of care provided by the staff.
  • Healthcare organizations that have received accreditation from the CARF reported a 26% increase in the number of patients seen annually, a 37% better conformance to quality standards, and a 37% conformance to their annual budgets.

Utilization Review Accreditation Commission (URAC)

Differentiation

  • The Utilization Review Accreditation Commission was the first to develop and release numerous industry standards and accreditation programs in the U.S., prompting other accreditation firms to follow suit. These programs included:
    • 1991: Health Utilization Review Standards
    • 1999: Case Management Accreditation program
    • 2004: Health Website Accreditation program
    • 2007: Pharmacy Benefit Management (PBM) Accreditation program
    • 2013: Clinical Integration Accreditation program
    • 2020: Remote Patient Monitoring Accreditation program
  • All URAC accreditation and certification programs are geared towards health organizations in large metropolitan areas and include metrics for improving standards of equality and inclusion.
  • The URAC offers an Accreditation & Certification Quiz that health organizations can take to help them decide which accreditations would best suit their business.
  • In the company’s own words, what makes the URAC accreditation programs unique is: “URAC’s independent approach to accreditation sets us apart. We rely on our multidisciplinary expert advisory groups from across health care to guide standard development. The result: programs with rigorous, evidence-based standards that set us apart as the ‘gold star’ accreditor.”
  • The URAC offers accreditations and certifications in the following categories:
  • All accreditation reviewers with the URAC are clinicians, including nurses and pharmacists, a majority of which have worked for a URAC-accredited healthcare organization in the past.

Pricing

  • The pricing information for all URAC accreditation programs is not publicly listed, as the organization states that the fee structure varies for each program.
  • The application fee for a URAC accreditation covers the cost of the desktop review, validation review, monitoring reviews, as well as access to the URAC accreditation guide, standard interpretations, and educational webinars.
  • The contact information to obtain a quote for URAC accreditation can be accessed here.

Revenue Streams

  • Based on IRS Form 990s, the primary source of revenue from the URAC each year is program services, such as accreditations, such as accreditations
  • Secondary sources of revenue earned by the URAC according to their IRS Form 990s include investment income, royalties, sales of assets, and other undefined sources.

Financial Statements

  • As the URAC is a tax-exempt non-profit organization, the business is not required to publicly disclose any financial information aside from their IRS Form 990 and proof of exemption. As a result, no financial statement documents were located for the URAC.
  • Despite the lack of publicly disclosed financial information by the URAC, the IRS Form 990s filed between 2010 and 2017 were located. These documents do contain the total revenue earned by the URAC each year, as well as a complete documentation of expenses. These documents are linked to below for the three most-recently published years:

Effects of Receiving Accreditation on Consumer Behavior & Experience

  • Pharmacies that earn accreditation from the URAC have proven that they provide an overall more comprehensive patient care, which includes a better focus on patient education and safety.
  • Patients trust the quality of care they are receiving from URAC-accredited healthcare organizations because it proves that they are meeting the highest of industry standards and best practices.
  • A study conducted by the URAC determined that 64% of healthcare organizations consider the URAC specialty pharmacy accreditation to be the most important type of third-party accreditation because of the program’s focus on quality, cost control, and proper use of services.

Barriers to Achieving Accreditation

  • Specialty pharmacies are beginning to feel as though having accreditation from a third-party firm is not enough to make the business competitive, particularly due to the large number of organizations that have now obtained accreditation. As a result, some are beginning to obtain accreditation from multiple firms or areas of expertise to further set them apart from competitors, which is neither time- nor cost-effective.
  • The costs associated not only with obtaining accreditation but also making the internal changes within a business needed to qualify for accreditation are often the greatest deterrents. Some health organizations feel as though the cost to apply for, and not necessarily know for sure that accreditation will be earned, outweigh the benefits of earning accreditation, and thus decide to opt-out.

Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC)

Differentiation

  • Accreditation through the AAAHC is specifically for healthcare organizations in the ambulatory health care market. This niche market ensures that associated companies are investing in a highly-focused accreditation, ensuring the highest industry standards are met upon approval.
  • The AAAHC holds Medicare deemed status from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), meaning that the AAAHC can accredit ambulatory surgical centers (ACSs) on behalf of the CMS.
  • The full list of organizations that are eligible to receive accreditation via the AAAHC can be viewed here.
  • The AAAHC houses the Institute for Quality Improvement, a sub-division of the AAAHC that conducts research to determine new standards and tools to define the requirements for obtaining an AAAHC accreditation.
  • The AAAHC distributes awards every year to their accredited organizations that display above-and-beyond levels of care and expertise or conducts notable studies related to the quality of care for patients. These awards include The Kershner — a QI Award and the Innovations in Quality Improvements award.
  • The accreditation process through the AAAHC is peer-based, meaning that qualification is determined by industry professionals who know the system and standards, rather than outside parties that are unfamiliar with requirements and goals.

Pricing

  • The total cost of accreditation from the AAAHC is determined upon review of a healthcare organizations’ application and supporting documentation.
  • Unlike other accreditation firms, the number of surveyors needed to verify an organization is not calculated into the total price of accreditation.
  • Factors that are calculated into the total price of accreditation include organization size, type, and range of services provided.
  • Organizations interested in earning accreditation via the AAAHC must first register for the informational virtual session, which includes a copy of the AAAHC Accreditation Handbook for Ambulatory Health Care. This handbook contains the pricing model. The current cost of registration is $995.
  • The respective prices for alternative accreditation handbooks available from the AAAHC can be viewed here. These handbooks vary in cost from $275.00-$1,885.00. Study reports are also available for purchase at $85.00 each.

Revenue Streams

  • Based on IRS Form 990s, the primary source of revenue from the AAAHC each year is program services, such as accreditations, such as accreditations
  • Secondary sources of revenue earned by the AAAHC according to their IRS Form 990s include investment income, sales of assets, net inventory sales, and other undefined sources.

Financial Statements

  • Although there is a link on the AAAHCs website for an annual report, no file is linked to on the page. Please review here for reference.
  • As the AAAHC is a tax-exempt non-profit organization, the business is not required to publicly disclose any financial information aside from their IRS Form 990 and proof of exemption. As a result, no financial statement documents were located for the AAAHC.
  • Despite the lack of publicly disclosed financial information by the AAAHC, the IRS Form 990s filed between 2011 and 2017 were located. These documents do contain the total revenue earned by the AAAHC each year, as well as a complete documentation of expenses. These documents are linked to below for the three most-recently published years:

Effects of Receiving Accreditation on Consumer Behavior & Experience

  • Patients tend to opt to receive care through an AAAHC-accredited healthcare organization because they are treated as an individual, not a statistic or group, and feel confident in the care they will receive.
  • In a study conducted by the Public Health Accreditation Board, 98% of healthcare organizations reported that earning accreditation motivated the business to improve the quality and performance of their work and patient care.
  • Patients that receive care from an AAAHC accredited facility have regular access to their treatment plans and clinical records,

Barriers to Achieving Accreditation

  • The quality improvement standards present the largest barrier for most AAAHC applicants. These standards vary significantly between facility operations and active on-site studies, and many healthcare organizations struggle to meet the requirements for both at the same time.
  • Other healthcare facilities struggle to stay up-to-date on accreditation requirements between survey years, making it more difficult to maintain accreditation or become re-accredited after the initial 3 years of being certified. AAAHC policies are updated annually in March, and organizations that fail to stay “survey-ready” tend to lose their accreditation status due to major variations in new requirements.

Council on Accreditation (COA)

Differentiation

  • The Council on Accreditation is federally recognized as an approved accreditor under the Qualified Residential Treatment Programs (QRTP), as well as the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).
  • The accreditation standards and rating indicators upheld by the COA are available for free, unlike other accreditation firms that require interested healthcare organizations to purchase handbooks with all requirements.
  • Every organization that is in the process of becoming COA-accredited is matched with a COA Accreditation Coordinator, who acts as a single point-of-contact for questions, concerns, and additional information throughout the accreditation process. This service is unique to the COA.
  • Site reviewers for the COA are volunteer, peer reviewers who either were or are employees of a COA-accredited organization, have at least 5 years of management/supervisory experience, and have a graduate degree in human service disciplines, as well as many other stringent requirements.
  • The COA published their own side-by-side comparison of the accreditation process and benefits between the CARF and the TJC that includes reference to variations between the support available, timeline, standards, price, accreditation process, and more.
  • Accreditations from the COA are valid for four years, where most other organizations’ accreditations last only for three years. The only certifications from the COA that do not last four years are those for opioid treatment programs, which the SAMHSA mandates can last for only 3 years.
  • The COA offers accreditation to social and human services that are offered via the following types of healthcare organizations:
  • The COA sponsors an Innovative Practices Award each year that highlights accredited organizations that have gone above and beyond company standards to change the lives of patients. This award provides winning healthcare organizations with a showcase on the COA website and social media pages, as well as a special logo for advertising and the opportunity to present at a COA-hosted event, among other benefits.

Pricing

  • The COA charges two fees for organizations looking to become accredited: an Accreditation Fee and a Site Visit Fee.
  • Healthcare organizations that are one of the COAs sponsored partners can receive 25% of the accreditation fee.
  • Organizations looking to become accredited via the COA must request a quote to obtain pricing information.
  • Outside estimates state that the COA application fee costs $750, and the annual fee for maintaining accreditation is $400. Other sources indicate that the minimum Accreditation Fee for an organization with less than $500,000 in revenue is at least $7,392, followed by a Site Visit Fee of $2,000 per reviewer for a two-day review and $475 per reviewer, per day after that.

Revenue Streams

  • Based on their annual reports, the primary source of revenue for the COA, which brought in 90.07% of total revenue in 2018, is program services, which includes:
    • Accreditation fees
    • Application fees
    • Annual agency fees
    • Annual sponsor fees
    • Publication sales
    • Training seminars
    • Site visit income
    • Special project income
  • Secondary sources of revenue for the COA brought in 9.93% of total revenue in 2018 and includes:
    • Contributed services
    • Contributions
    • Other

Financial Statements

Effects of Receiving Accreditation on Consumer Behavior & Experience

  • Based on testimonials from COA-accredited organizations, patients take pride and comfort in getting care from these locations, as they know they are receiving the most excellent care possible. The COA logos are what help patients know the quality of care they are going to receive is the best of the best.
  • The staff that work at COA-accredited facilities feel comfortable and confident in their working environments, primarily because of the support and clarity received during the accreditation process.

Barriers to Achieving Accreditation

  • According to the COA, most organizations that are working to obtain accreditation struggle with the Performance and Quality Improvement (PQI) process, which involves a healthcare organization making changes to meet COA standards for accreditation.

Considering & Limiting Liability

  • Healthcare accreditation firms implement a Code of Conduct or Privacy Policy that publicizes their dedication to protecting the private information of those that they accredit, as well as their efforts to protect the business at all costs. These document for each of the above-listed accreditation firms are listed below:
  • The Joint Commission has a location in Washington, D.C. that works directly with the federal government to derive public policies that promote safe healthcare for all and help align industry standards with the company’s accreditation requirements.
  • TJC collaborates with insurance companies for health care organizations. These payor partnerships protect TJC in case of on-site errors in accredited organizations, and also covers any associated costs for the healthcare organization involved if they are accredited by TJC.
  • In U.S. legislature, courts tend to side with accreditation organizations in the case of a lawsuit because the standards they set are highly respected and known for being reasonable in terms of the care they aim to provide to patients.
  • Accreditation firms abide by antitrust laws, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and laws associated with negligence and due process among others to limit their liability amongst the healthcare organizations they accredit.
  • In terms of the standards set by accreditation firms, requirements are made as clear, fair, and reasonable as possible, including no more stringent than absolutely necessary so that interested healthcare facilities can realistically apply and adjust their business to meet standards. By setting up the accreditation programs in this manner, accreditation firms ensure that any interested parties can apply and be granted accreditation.
  • Periodic reviews, which are part of the accreditation process by all accreditation firms, help cover liability issues by the accrediting firm by ensuring all approved organizations are continuously meeting industry standards.
  • Accreditation organizations also obtain association professional liability insurance (APLI) to ensure they are covered in a court of law in case a liability issue does arise. APLI does not cover physical damages to people or property, but rather the accreditation firm’s policies and right to operate.

Barriers to Obtaining Accreditation

  • In local communities with smaller public health organizations, a common barrier to obtaining accreditation is associated with the minimal or complete lack of funds from local governments to cover the costs associated with obtaining accreditation, including membership dues, service charges, and application fees.
  • Small public health companies reported in a study that they fear the price of obtaining accreditation, particularly with the lack of government funding, would not outweigh the benefits. Instead, many would rather focus on improving specific departments over time to save money and better patient care at the same time.
  • The high costs of obtaining accreditation, followed by the minimal incentives (due to it not being a requirement in most states), prevents many healthcare organizations from investing in an accreditation.
  • For some healthcare organizations, the lack of communication about the accreditation process and requirements between management and employees often results in the failure of becoming accredited.
  • In a study published by the Journal of Management Studies, the most commonly reported barriers across literature reviews of healthcare organizations attempting to earn accreditation include legal support, financial incentives, professional organization requirements, and overall quality improvement.
  • Upon obtaining accreditation, many healthcare firms report that sustaining the title is highly problematic, as it often requires increasing staff workload, greater overall spending, and extreme changes in day-to-day operations that involve a steep learning curve. These hurdles can present more struggle than some healthcare companies feel it is worth to market their accreditation, resulting in them not reapplying upon their accreditation expiring.
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